Congratulations!

Your workforce development journey is well underway!

We cannot solve problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.

—Albert Einstein

The Workforce Development Framework

The entire Workforce Development Framework is show. On the right side, steps 1 - 4 in the Workforce Development Planning Process of the Workforce Development Framework (WDF) are highlighted. The four steps include: Step 1. Identify Need: Organizational Assessment, Step 2. Gather Data: Environmental Assessment, step 3. Analyze Workforce Supply & Demand, Step 4. Identify Gaps, Step 5. Close the Gaps, and Step 6. Monitor & Evaluate.The left-side of the Workforce Development Framework (WDF), shows the following components within Step 5-Close the Gaps, displayed in a circular workflow: 1. Job Analysis & Position Requirements, 2. Education & Professional Preparation, 3. Recruitment, Screening, & Selection, 4. Incentives & Work Conditions, 5. Professional Development Training, 6. Organizational Environment, 7. Community Context, 8. Supervision & Performance Management. In the middle of the circle, there is a component labeled as , Mission, Values. Surrounding the Vision, Mission, Values is another component, labeled Leadership.

You and your team are on a challenging, yet highly meaningful and worthwhile, journey of workforce development. Developing the Action Plan is just one step along the path. It represents the customized “roadmap” for your agency.

We know that implementing and sustaining your Action Plan will present a new set of challenges. There will be roadblocks along the way.

Recent research points to the science of change management and the factors that contribute to successful implementation of a change effort.

By using a structured, evidence-informed change implementation process, your agency will be more likely to achieve and sustain long-term success in developing and retaining a committed child welfare workforce—one that embraces the vision and mission of your agency and its critical role in supporting positive outcomes for children, youth, and families.

Remember—the workforce matters! Use NCCWI's powerful infographic, Why the Worforce Matters, to help spread the word to your team and agency.

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References

Brimhall, K. C., Lizano, E. L., & Mor Barak, M. E. (2014). The mediating role of inclusion: A longitudinal study of the effects of leader-member exchange and diversity climate on job satisfaction and intention to leave among child welfare workers. Children and Youth Services Review, 40 (May), 79–88.

Center for the Study of Social Policy. (2006). Self-assessment workbook for building a stable and quality child welfare workforce. Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved from http://www.pacwrc.pitt.edu/Organizational%20Effectiveness/LeadershipAcademy/CSSP_Workbook.pdf

Children’s Defense Fund & Children’s Rights. (2006). Components of an effective child welfare workforce to improve outcomes for children and families: What does the research tell us? Houston, TX: Cornerstones for Kids.

CPS Human Resource Services. (2007). Workforce planning tool kit: Supply/demand analysis and gap analysis. Washington, DC and Sacramento, CA: Author. Retrieved from http://www.cpshr.us/workforceplanning/documents/ToolKitSuppDemGapAnalysis.pdf

CPS HR Consulting. (n.d). Workforce planning portal. Retrieved from http://www.cpshr.us/workforce_planning.html

Cyphers, G. (2001). Report from the child welfare workforce survey: State and county data and findings. Washington, DC: American Public Human Services Association.

Fairfax County Department of Human Resources. (2003). Strategic workforce planning. Retrieved from http://ncwwi.org/files/Workforce_Development_Process/Fairfax_Virginia_workforceplanningmanual.pdf

Faller, K. C., Grabarek, M., & Ortega, R. M. (2010). Commitment to child welfare work: What predicts leaving and staying? Children and Youth Services Review, 32(6), 840–846.

Fine, E., & Handelsman, J. (2012). Reviewing applicants: Research on bias and assumptions. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin-Madison, Women in Science & Engineering Leadership Institute.

Flower, C., McDonald, J., & Sumski, M. (2005). Review of turnover in Milwaukee County private agency child welfare ongoing case management staff. Milwaukee, WI: Bureau of Milwaukee Child Welfare.

Georgia Department of Administrative Services. (n.d). Workforce planning. Retrieved from http://doas.ga.gov/human-resources-administration/hr-tools/workforce-planning

Gupta, A., & Blewett, J. (2007). Change for children? The challenges and opportunities for the children’s social work workforce. Child and Family Social Work, 12(2), 172–181.

Hwang, J., & Hopkins, K. M. (2015). A structural equation model of the effects of diversity characteristics and inclusion on organizational outcomes in the child welfare workforce. Children and Youth Services Review, 50(January), 44–52.

International Personnel Management Association. (2002). Workforce planning resource guide for public sector human resource professionals. Alexandria, VA: Author

Minnesota Philanthropy Partners. (2013). Facing race: A renewed commitment to racial equity. St. Paul, MN: Author.

National Association of Workforce Development Professionals. (2013). Certified workforce development professional (CWDP) competencies. Retrieved from http://www.nawdp.org/Portals/1/Certification/CWDP%20Competencies.pdf

National Child Welfare Workforce Institute. (2010). Leadership competency framework. Albany, NY: Author. Retrieved from https://ncwwi.org/files/LeaderCompFrame5-31-2011.pdf

National Child Welfare Workforce Institute. (2010). Module 3: Leading people. [Leadership Academy for Supervisors]. Albany, NY: Author.

National Child Welfare Workforce Institute. (2013). A comprehensive workforce strategy to advance child welfare outcomes. Albany, NY: Author. Retrieved from https://ncwwi.org/files/Comprehensive_Workforce_Strategy_FINAL_DRAFT.pdf

National Child Welfare Workforce Institute. (2013). Twelve NCWWI traineeship programs: Comprehensive summary of legacies & lessons learned. Albany, NY: Author. Retrieved from https://ncwwi.org/files/NCWWI_Traineeships_Comprehensive_Summary_Legacies_Lessons_Learned_Sept2013.pdf

National Child Welfare Workforce Institute. (2015). Workforce development framework (WDF). Albany, NY: University at Albany. Retrieved from http://ncwwi.org/files/NCWWI_Workforce_Development_Framework_Overview.pdf

National Child Welfare Workforce Institute (Producer). (2016). Leadership academy for supervisors (LAS) take the lead series: Coaching strategies [Video file]. Retrieved from http://ncwwilas.com/coaching/player.html

National Child Welfare Workforce Institute (Producer). (2016). Leadership academy for supervisors (LAS) take the lead series: Diversity leadership strategies [Video file]. Retrieved from http://ncwwilas.com/diversity/player.html

National Child Welfare Workforce Institute (Producer). (2016). Leadership academy for supervisors (LAS) take the lead series: Recruitment strategies [Video file]. Retrieved from http://www.ncwwilas.com/recruitment/player.html

National Child Welfare Workforce Institute (Producer). (2016). Leadership academy for supervisors (LAS) take the lead series: Screening strategies [Video file]. Retrieved from http://www.ncwwilas.com/screening/player.html

Ortega, R. M., Grogan-Kaylor, A., Ruffolo, M., Clarke, J., & Karb, R. (2010). “Racial and ethnic diversity in the initial child welfare experience,” in M. B. Webb, K. Dowd, B. J. Harden, J. Landsverk, & M. F. Testa (Eds.), Child welfare and child well-being: New perspectives from the national survey of child and adolescent well-being. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Sunset Advisory Commission. (2014, August). Staff report with Commission decisions: Department of Family and Protective Services. Austin, TX: Texas State Legislature. Retrieved from https://ncwwi.org/files/Change_Implementation/Sunset_Advisory_Commission_Staff_Report_with_Commission_Decisions.pdf

U.S. General Accounting Office. (2003). Child welfare: HHS could play a greater role in helping child welfare agencies recruit and retain staff. [GAO 03-357]. Highlights. Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved from http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d03357.pdf

U.S. Geological Survey, Office of Human Resources, Strategic Initiatives Team. (2013). United States Geological Survey: Workforce planning desk guide. Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved from https://www2.usgs.gov/humancapital/sw/workforceplanning/documents/WFPlanningGuide.doc

U.S. Office of Personnel Management (2011). Migration planning guidance information documents: Workforce planning best practices. Retrieved from https://www.opm.gov/services-for-agencies/hr-line-of-business/migration-planning-guidance/workforce-planning-best-practices.pdf

U.S. Office of Personnel Management. (2005). Strategic alignment system: Workforce planning [Chart]. Washington, DC: Author.

Victoria State Government, Department of Education & Early Childhood Development. (2013). Workforce planning. Retrieved from http://www.education.vic.gov.au/hrweb/workm/pages/wrkplansch.aspx

Washington State Human Resources. (2009). Introduction to workforce planning. Retrieved from http://www.dop.wa.gov/WorkforceDataAndPlanning/WorkforcePlanning/Pages/IntroductiontoWorkforcePlanning.aspx